brief history of the Staunton and James River Turnpike

by Young, Douglas

Publisher: Virginia Highway & Transportation Research Council in Charlottesville, Va

Written in English
Published: Pages: 22 Downloads: 195
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Places:

  • Virginia.

Subjects:

  • Roads -- Virginia.

Edition Notes

Statementby Douglas Young.
SeriesHistoric roads of Virginia
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHE356.V8 Y68 1980
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 22 p. :
Number of Pages22
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4239978M
LC Control Number80620005

  Virginia Mills For Sale, Richmond Enquirer. Courtesy Virginia Chronicle. In , a law suit brought by Asbury Crenshaw and Thomas B. Crenshaw against The Slate River Company was heard in the Court of Appeals of Virginia. The record includes a series of Virginia Mill owners, beginning with patentee James Skelton and ending with the. A Brief History, Aull, Edward. Early History of Staunton and Beverley Manor in Augusta County. Augusta Historical Bulletin. to the present. journal of the Augusta County Historical Society. Bailey, Kenneth P. The Ohio Company of Virginia and the Westward Movement— Second Edition, The James River and Kanawha Turnpike was completed from White Sulphur Springs to Kenova in , blazing the trail generally followed a century later by U.S. The Grayson-Raleigh Turnpike, constructed in the s, connected Grayson County with more distant markets. The Matthews Living History Museum was founded to preserve the cultural heritage of upper New River Valley farm life by presenting its artifacts, tools, equipment, methods and skills.

A brief History of Bedford County and on the South by Smith Mountain Lake, and on the East by the James River. Long before the coming of European explorers, native American Indians lived here, at least as far back in time as several thousand years B.C. A dam was built on the Staunton River, creating Smith Mountain Lake, which reached. Map of Virginia, between Staunton and Clarksburg (West Virginia) Staunton during the Civil War. Contributed by Catherine M. Wright. Staunton, Virginia, the seat of Augusta County, was a key target in two major campaigns during the American Civil War (–), and remained strategically important throughout the entire war. Confederate Military History/Volume 3/Chapter 5 until good roads from nearly every county town in the basin of the Big Kanawha led into the James river and Kanawha turnpike, the main stage road from Staunton through Lewisburg, Charleston, and thence to the mouth of the Kanawha, and also to that of the Guyandotte near the Kentucky boundary. Confederate Military History/Volume 3/Chapter 30 picketed the line of Jackson's river, at Hightown and points to the south of that, Cheat mountain, on the Staunton and Parkersburg turnpike, near the Big Spring beyond Marlinton, and points in the upper Greenbrier valley. the march was continued to the Rope Ferry, on James river below.

Most-cast actor in Brown County Playhouse history, appearing in. He also directed David Lindsay. Robert James Waller DBA68 wrote. The Bridges of Madison County, on History of the Staunton and James River Turnpike, by Douglas Young. The road and bridge orders contained in the order books of Spotsylvania County are the.

brief history of the Staunton and James River Turnpike by Young, Douglas Download PDF EPUB FB2

An Index to Roads in the Albemarle County Surveyors Booksby Nathaniel Mason Paw1ett A Brief History of the Staunton and James River Turnpike, by Douglas Young Albemarle County Road Ordersby Nathaniel Mason Pawlett A Brief History of the Roads of Virginiaby Nathaniel Mason Pawlett.

A Brief History of the Staunton and James River Turnpike [Virginia] Published With Permission from the Virginia Transportation Research Council (A Cooperative Organization Sponsored Jointly by the Virginia Department of Transportation and the University of Virginia - Virginia Genealogical Society.

The establishment and maintenance of public roads were among the most important functions of the. Get this from a library. A brief history of the Staunton and James River Turnpike.

[Douglas Young]. Virginia: Staunton: A Brief History of the Staunton and James River Turnpike VHB L. Staunton to Scott's landing on the James River with asubscription of $, The company formed, known as the Staunton and James River Turnpike Company, had the right to desiznate the point on the James River for the road's termi- nation.

•5) This bill Was revived on March 8,•and mentioned that the state would finance two-fifths of the. A Brief History of the Staunton and James River Turnpike, by Douglas Young. 22 pages, illustrated, map. Albemarle County Road Ordersby Nathaniel Mason Brief history of the Staunton and James River Turnpike book.

pages, indexed. A Brief History of the Roads of Virginiaby Nathaniel Mason Pawlett. 41 pages, 3 maps. James River with a subscription of $, The company formed, known as the Staunton and James River Turnpike Company, had the right to design_ate the point on the James River for the road's termi- nation.

An Index to Roads in the Albemarle County Surveyor’s Booksby Nathaniel Mason Pawlett A Brief History of the Staunton and James River Turnpike, by Douglas Young Albemarle County Road Ordersby Nathaniel Mason Pawlett A Brief History of Roads in Virginiaby Nathaniel Mason Pawlett A Guide to the.

The community's development was spurred by the completion of the Staunton and James River Turnpike, which was authorized by the Commonwealth of Virginia in and began construction in [4] [5] This turnpike connected the fertile farmlands of the Shenandoah Valley near Staunton to Scottsville on the James River, a distance of miles.

Construction of the Valley Turnpike in the late s was the road-building project that most affected Staunton. The macadamized turnpike ran between Winchester and Staunton, a distance of about ninety-five miles.

For much of its length, it followed the old Wagon Road, which, in turn, had followed the Warriors' Path of the Iroquois. Wise, William. The History of Staunton Baseball, Wood, Alice. Francis T. Stribling and Moral Medicine—Curing the Insane at Virginia’s Western State Hospital: Wust, Klaus.

The Virginia Germans. Young, Douglas. A Brief History of the Staunton and James River Turnpike. Among them was a road connecting Staunton and Scottsville, known as the Staunton and James River Turnpike.

This report focuses on the history of this road and traces its life, mainly through the use of documents relating to it.

Included is a brief discussion of the reasons for its construction and the factors that led to its eventual failure. 7 9 Census. 7 Census. 8 Charts. 8 4 Charts.

2 13 Chestnut Grove Baptist Church (Albemarle County, Va.). 8 5 Clippings. 8 Clippings - Liberty, Clay County, and Missouri History. 8 Clippings - Liberty, Clay County, and Missouri History.

9 Colonial Churches in New Jersey. 9 3 Colonial Dames. 9 4 Cone, Lois. The turnpike’s beginning dates back to Februwhen Virginia’s General Assembly passed a bill authorizing the construction of a turnpike connecting Staunton to Scott’s landing on the James River for a cost of $, to facilitate a more efficient trade route.

This is a list of turnpike roads, built and operated by nonprofit turnpike trusts or private companies in exchange for the privilege of collecting a toll, in the U.S.

states of Virginia and West Virginia, mainly in the 19th most of the roads are now maintained as. Inby act of the Virginia Assembly the trail also known as the Kanawha Turnpike was named the James River and Kanawha Turnpike, soon afterwards the road was completed, along present day U.S.

Ro as far west as present-day Charleston. A Brief History of the Staunton and James River Turnpike An Index to Roads in the Albamarle County Surveyor's Books, 6 Callaway Bumper Stickers 7 Newspaper Articles on Callaway Family members 8 The Callaway Family in America and in the South 9 National Geographic, Vol.No.

6, December OP Box 1. The Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike was built in what is now the U.S. states of Virginia and West Virginia during the second quarter of the 19th century to provide a roadway from Staunton, Virginia and the upper Shenandoah Valley to the Ohio River at present-day Parkersburg, West ered by Claudius Crozet through the mountainous terrain, it was a toll road partially funded by the.

InJoseph Sutherland Jr. began construction of a tavern on what was to be known as the James River Turnpike. Construction was completed in Joseph's son, Clifton Garland (CG), managed the tavern and its working farm of approximately acres.

CG and his wife Mary, along with their 16 children lived and worked on the property. This Native-American trail started near the James River, and went through Ft.

Henry (later Petersburg, VA), southwesterly to the Indian trading town of Occaneechi (Clarksville, VA), then to the Waxhaws (Charlotte, NC), and Cherokee villages of the Carolinas and Georgia.

The length of the route was roughly miles ( km). A brief history of the Staunton and James River Turnpike: second revised edition March Published Date: Abstract: During the early nineteenth century the United States experienced a period of growth and expansion. A brief history of the Staunton and James River Turnpike: May Published Date: Abstract.

A Brief History The Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike is an historic road from Virginia’s upper Shenandoah Valley to the Ohio River. Begun in and completed byit was designed by master engineer Claudius Crozet.

The turnpike was the gateway to the Shenandoah Valley and was prized by both Union and Confederate armies during the Civil. A Brief History of the Staunton and James River Turnpike [Virginia] Published With Permission from the Virginia Transportation Research Council (A Cooperative Organization Sponsored Jointly by the VA Dept of Transportation and the University of VA by Virginia Genealogical Society.

A Brief History of the Staunton and James River Turnpike, c Young, Douglas. ABD: A Locomotive Engineer's Album: the Saga of Steam Engines in America, c Abdill, George B.

HAW: America's Western Frontiers: The Exploration and Settlement of the Trans-Mississippi West., c Hawgood, John A. BALTIMORE. North Western Turnpike (also 1 Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal, 23 Front Royal and Gaines's Cross Roads Turnpike, 567 Shenandoah River, 89 Tye River and Blue Ridge Turnpike, 10 [not sure], 1112131415 German Settlement to Morgantown and Beverley Road, 1617 Hardy and Winchester Turnpike, Staunton- Parkersburg Turnpike.

James River & Kanawha Turnpike. (Midland Trail or Rt. 60) White Sulphur Springs to Guyandotte. National Road. (Rt. 40/I corridor) Cumberland, MD to Wheeling.

Kanawha Salt Co. (early trust) US History Timeline of Important Events. terms. Tennessee History 2: Final Exam. History. Ivy tornado killed 10 in one family. Harold Reid was driving force behind Statler Brothers.

Betsy Bell and Mary Gray: Mountains and plague victims. Outbreaks: Valley faced fear of death but remained largely protected in past. Staunton & James River Turnpike was forerunner of Route The Inn has served no other purpose in its history than as a stop for the weary traveler.

It recalls the period of the 's when the Inn first served as a tavern and overnight lodging for farmers and travelers using the Staunton-James River turnpike and has been virtually unaltered since its construction.

One of the many entries in the daybook carefully records the number of gallons of. Crossroads. The Great Wagon Road extended though the area to the west of the modern Route 11 corridor. It crossed the Maury River at a location known as Campbell’s Ford (now Staunton) and the James River at Looney’s Ferry (now Buchanan).

The Board of Public Works directed Claudius Crozet to survey a canal route between the Roanoke River and the James River.

His report concludes that the general assumption of an easy connection cannot be supported. From the description of James River to Roanoke River Canal field notes, (Library of Virginia).

WorldCat record id:. After all, the foundations of Virginia's history are built upon this river. So, too, is the history of the town of Scottsville. Scottsville finds itself upon the Horseshoe Bend, an isolated meander of the James River, bounded for many miles to the east and west by relatively straight stretches of river.The National Road became US 40, the James River and Kanawha Turnpike became US 60, the Northwestern Turnpike became US 50, and the Staunton and Parkersburg Turnpike is now US Ma Birth of U.S.

Senator & journalist William Chilton.This regiment fell back as far the base of Cloyd's Mountain, 10 miles from Dublin Deport, Virginia and Tennessee Railroad. When this occurred I was at the White Springs, preparing to withdraw the forces on the James River and Kanawha turnpike to some point at or near the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, which was rendered necessary in consequence of the abandonment of the Virginia Central.